Target 5: Governments, key sectors and stakeholders at all levels have taken steps to achieve or have implemented plans for sustainable production and consumption, keeping the impacts of use of natural resources, including habitats, on migratory species well within safe ecological limits to promote the favourable conservation status of migratory species and maintain the quality, integrity, resilience, and ecological connectivity of their habitats and migration routes.

 

Anthropogenic Impact:

 

►    The CMS COP Resolution 11.30 (2014) on Management of Marine Debris includes:

Objective 2 - Commercial Marine Vessel Best Practice:

14) Strongly encourages Parties to address the issue of abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear (ALDFG), by following the strategies set out under the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries;

16) Invites the United Nations Environment Programme to continue and increase its leading role in acting as a moderator between the different stakeholders in the maritime industry, and facilitating coordination to enable best practice measures to be implemented;

17) Encourages shipping operators and other key industries involved with the international transport of goods to drive environmental demands, including adopting the indirect fees system in ports, supporting the improvement of port waste reception facilities in general, adopting, where possible, the use of waste-to-energy systems on vessels and implementing relevant ISO standards.

Details supporting the recommendations in the above-mentioned Resolution 11.30 (2014) on Management of Marine Debris and providing guidance on ways to implement them can be found in the Ascobans Report ►Marine Debris and Commercial Marine Vessel Best Practice.

►   The CMS COP Resolution 11.16 (2011) on The Prevention of Illegal Killing, Taking, and Trade of Migratory Birds calls on the Secretariat to convene an Intergovernmental Task Force to Address Illegal Killing, Taking and Trade of Migratory Birds in the Mediterranean.

►  The Resolution 11.26 Programme of Work on Climate Change and Migratory Species includes:

Measures to facilitate species adaptation in response to climate change:

· Improve the resilience of migratory species and their habitats to climate change, and ensure habitat availability for the full lifecycle of the species, now and in the future, inter alia through the following actions:

o Identify and prioritize areas currently experiencing rapid climate impacts that are important to migratory species.

o Ensure that individual sites are sufficiently large, holding a variety of habitats and topography.

o Ensure there is physical and ecological connectivity between sites, aiding species dispersal and colonization when distributions shift.

o Consider the designation of seasonal protected areas or restrictions on land-use in areas where migratory species occur at critical stages in their lifecycle and would benefit from such protection.

o Undertake specific management to eliminate, counteract or compensate for detrimental impacts of climate change and other potential threats that may interact with or exacerbate climate change.

►  The Resolution 10.19 Migratory Species Conservation in the Light of Climate Change includes:

6) Urges Parties and the Scientific Council, and encourages conservation stakeholders and relevant organizations to:

6.a) Improve the resilience of migratory species and their habitats to climate change, inter alia by reducing other threats in order to maintain or increase population size and genetic diversity.

8) Urges Parties, when implementing Resolution 10.3 on ecological networks and related instruments, to improve the resilience of migratory species and their habitats to climate change in order to achieve the following objectives:

8.a) To ensure that individual sites are sufficiently large, holding a variety of habitats and topography;

8.b) To strengthen the physical and ecological connectivity between sites, aiding species dispersal and colonization when distributions shift; and

8.c) To consider the designation of seasonal protected areas in areas where migratory species occur at critical stages in their lifecycle and would benefit from extra protection.

 

Aquatic Species

 

►    The ASCOBANS Conservation Plan for the Harbour Porpoise population in the Western Baltic, the Belt Sea and the Kattegat includes:

Recommendation 10 - Include monitoring and management of important prey species in national harbour porpoise management plans:

Action required:

· Data on preferred prey and prey communities should lead to sustainable management of these species to ensure favourable long-term conservation status for both the fish species and of harbour porpoises.

· Cooperation between researchers and national authorities.

· Agreements between the Parties concerned on management of fisheries on relevant prey species. Requisite national legislation.

· Emphasis should also be given to the investigation of biology and distribution of non-commercial prey-species.

 

Recommendation 11 - Restore or maintain habitat quality:

Action required:

· Full implementation of the MSFD and relevant decisions by ASCOBANS, HELCOM, CMS and other relevant international bodies. Requisite national legislation.

· Monitoring of the effect on porpoise behaviour and distribution of new projects such as marine constructions, shipping, seismic testing and other noise sources.

►    The CMS COP Resolution 10.28 (2011) on the Saker Falcon includes:

4) Decides that improvements in the conservation status of the Saker Falcon in any Range State may allow sustainable taking from the wild in that Range State under a management system. In such cases a Party or Parties may request an exclusion from Appendix I listing to apply in that Range State. The Task Force will endeavour to facilitate this process through the Scientific Council inter-sessionally and through the Conference of the Parties.

►    The Resolution 10.3- The Role ofEcological Networks in the Conservation of Migratory Species includes:

2) Encourages Parties and other Range States, when identifying areas of importance to migratory terrestrial, avian and aquatic species, to take into account and make explicit by description, schematic maps or conceptual models the relationship between those areas and other areas which may be ecologically linked to them, in physical terms, for example as connecting corridors, or in other ecological terms, for example as breeding areas related to non-breeding areas, stopover sites, feeding and resting places.

5) Highlights the added value of developing ecological networks under CMS where no other network instruments are available, as for example with the West Central Asian Flyway Site Network and the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Site Network, and urges Parties and invites Range States to strengthen management of existing network sites and their further development through designation and management of additional sites.

►    The Resolution 11.25- Advancing Ecological Networks to address the Needs of Migratory Species includes:

10) Also urges Parties to monitor adequately ecological networks to allow early detection of any deterioration in quality of sites, rapid identification of threats and timely action to maintain network integrity, making use where appropriate of existing monitoring methods, such as the IBA Monitoring Framework developed by BirdLife International and the International Waterbird Census coordinated by Wetlands International.